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Deal-breakers? Regulating foreign direct investment for national security in Australia and the United States

I have a new report out with the United States Studies Centre, Deal-breakers? Regulating foreign direct investment for national security in Australia and the United States.

David Uren’s write-up in The Australian here.

There is an op-ed version in the Sydney Morning Herald.

posted on 26 July 2018 by skirchner in Foreign Investment

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World trade is squarely in the firing line of the Trump revolution

I get a mention in this article by David Uren on the end game for the Trump Administration’s trade war with the rest of the world.

posted on 19 July 2018 by skirchner in Free Trade & Protectionism

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Donald Trump and US tariffs: A 1930s-style trade war will be hard to avert

I have a piece at ABC News Online arguing we should not underestimate the seriousness of the trade war unfolding between the US and the rest of the world.

posted on 11 July 2018 by skirchner in Free Trade & Protectionism

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Trump’s tariff war doesn’t play to America’s great strengths

I have an op-ed in today’s AFR on America’s move away from its traditional open door policy towards foreign investment. Text below the fold.

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posted on 05 July 2018 by skirchner in Foreign Investment, Free Trade & Protectionism

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Trump Administration Divided on Trade Policy

I have an op-ed in the AFR noting the contradictions in US international economic policy. Full text below the fold (may differ slightly from edited AFR version).

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posted on 23 May 2018 by skirchner in Free Trade & Protectionism

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Don’t Sacrifice the Inflation Target on the Altar of Financial Stability

I have an op-ed at The Conversation on what happens when the RBA sacrifices its inflation target on the altar of financial stability.

posted on 16 May 2018 by skirchner in Monetary Policy

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Trump pursuing the wrong strategy against China

I have an op-ed in the AFR arguing President Trump is pursuing the wrong trade policy strategy against China. Full text below the fold.

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posted on 09 April 2018 by skirchner in Free Trade & Protectionism

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Making America 1930 Again

I have an op-ed in the AFR on Trump’s latest tariff measures. Full text below the fold.

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posted on 05 March 2018 by skirchner in Economics, Free Trade & Protectionism

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Donald Trump has a chance to shape US monetary policy for years

I have an op-ed in today’s AFR on how Obama’s neglect gives Trump the chance to own the leadership of the Federal Reserve Board. Full text below the fold (may differ slightly from published version).

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posted on 14 February 2018 by skirchner in Economics, Financial Markets, Monetary Policy

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My Review of Sebastian Mallaby’s Bio of Alan Greenspan

The latest issue of CIS Policy includes my review of Sebastian Mallaby’s biography of Alan Greenspan. Here is a sample:

Far from being a tragedy, Greenspan’s tenure at the Fed was a spectacular success, as Mallaby for the most part acknowledges. This is not to say that US monetary policy could not have been improved by a more rules-based and transparent approach. Mallaby briefly mentions nominal gross domestic product targeting as an alternative to inflation targeting, but does not elaborate on its significance. Greenspan could have moved the Fed in these directions at the expense of his own authority and influence. While one can fault Greenspan’s highly discretionary approach to monetary policy on procedural and other grounds, the results were far better than could reasonably be expected and this is in no small part due to Greenspan’s judgement, which was spectacularly right more often than not. Had Greenspan gone against his own free market instincts and sought to second-guess financial markets on asset prices, as Mallaby suggests, the results would almost certainly have been disastrous and his biography would relate a different type of tragedy. The counter-factual in which someone other than Greenspan was Fed Chair (and we largely know who the alternatives might have been) is one that is worth contemplating.

Full article here.

posted on 29 March 2017 by skirchner in Economics, Financial Markets

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The G20 and Global Governance

The latest issue of The Cato Journal includes my article on The G20 and Global Governance, a critique of state-sponsored global governance scholarship.

posted on 26 September 2016 by skirchner in Economics

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High Frequency Trading: Fact & Fiction

The latest issue of the CIS journal Policy includes my article on High Frequency Trading: Fact and Fiction.

posted on 14 March 2016 by skirchner in Centre for Independent Studies, Economics, Financial Markets

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Too Much Finance?

I have an op-ed in the AFR looking at the long-run relationship between financial sector size and living standards that addresses the ‘too much finance’ critique. Full text below the fold.

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posted on 11 January 2016 by skirchner in Economics, Financial Markets

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Capital Gains Tax Reform in Canada: Lessons from Abroad

The Fraser Institute has released a new volume on international experience with capital gains taxes. I wrote the chapter on New Zealand, with some reference to Australia. Australia was deemed too similar to Canada to warrant a chapter in its own right.

posted on 07 November 2014 by skirchner in Economics

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I am leaving CIS and returning to financial markets

This is my last week at CIS. I will be returning to financial markets from whence I came back in 2008. Thanks to Greg Lindsay for giving me a platform to participate in the public policy debate over the last few years. Thanks also to those who contributed to Policy while I was editor over the last 18 months. Policy will continue under a new editor.

My new employer won’t be paying me to blog or tweet during business hours, so you will be hearing even less from me on what is already a very low frequency blog. I will still post material here from time to time and link to what I am doing when appropriate. Needless to say, nothing on this web site should be attributed to current or previous employers.

This blog has followed me around in various roles since 2003, back when economics blogs were a rarity. The economics blogosphere is now a very over-crowded space. Since 2009, Scott Sumner has been saying much of what I wanted to say, only better. It is more efficient for me to send him a link and have him blog on it than to do it myself. So go read him if you don’t already.

posted on 28 August 2014 by skirchner in Centre for Independent Studies, Economics, Financial Markets

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