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High Frequency Trading: Fact & Fiction

The latest issue of the CIS journal Policy includes my article on High Frequency Trading: Fact and Fiction.

posted on 14 March 2016 by skirchner in Centre for Independent Studies, Economics, Financial Markets

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I am leaving CIS and returning to financial markets

This is my last week at CIS. I will be returning to financial markets from whence I came back in 2008. Thanks to Greg Lindsay for giving me a platform to participate in the public policy debate over the last few years. Thanks also to those who contributed to Policy while I was editor over the last 18 months. Policy will continue under a new editor.

My new employer won’t be paying me to blog or tweet during business hours, so you will be hearing even less from me on what is already a very low frequency blog. I will still post material here from time to time and link to what I am doing when appropriate. Needless to say, nothing on this web site should be attributed to current or previous employers.

This blog has followed me around in various roles since 2003, back when economics blogs were a rarity. The economics blogosphere is now a very over-crowded space. Since 2009, Scott Sumner has been saying much of what I wanted to say, only better. It is more efficient for me to send him a link and have him blog on it than to do it myself. So go read him if you don’t already.

posted on 28 August 2014 by skirchner in Centre for Independent Studies, Economics, Financial Markets

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Eight Housing Affordability Myths

I have published a new Issue Analysis with the Centre for Independent Studies, Eight Housing Affordability Myths. In the paper, I show how a number of highly persistent myths about the nature of housing markets, the dynamics of house prices and the drivers of housing affordability condition public policy to focus on excessively on housing demand at the expense of housing supply.

posted on 09 July 2014 by skirchner in Centre for Independent Studies, Economics, Foreign Investment, House Prices

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The CIS Journal ‘Policy’ has a New Editor

I have taken over as the editor of Policy, journal of the Centre for Independent Studies. I am currently finalising the Autumn (southern hemisphere!) issue, but I am looking for contributions to the Winter issue with a deadline of 30 April.

Please keep Policy in mind as an outlet for your ideas. Policy reaches an influential audience and we are planning a number of initiatives to extend its reach and build the subscriber base.

We are open to feature articles, interviews, review essays and book reviews covering a wide range of policy issues and ideas from any disciplinary perspective. Note that contributions are subject to a refereeing process.

Feel free to get in touch to discuss any ideas you may have. Contributor deadlines for future issues are as follows:

Winter 2013: 30 April
Spring 2013: 30 July
Summer 2013/14: 30 October

posted on 21 March 2013 by skirchner in Centre for Independent Studies

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Incise: New CIS Blog

The Centre for Independent Studies has a new blog called incise. I will cross-post between the two blogs, although some material that appears here won’t appear there. Institutional Economics will remain the definitive source for all my bloggy and other goodness. Note that I now tweet more than I blog, so join my 100 odd Twitter followers here if you haven’t already done so.

posted on 05 September 2011 by skirchner in Centre for Independent Studies

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CIS on Facebook

The Centre for Independent Studies has a Facebook page that can be used to follow CIS media, publications and events.  The latest issue of Policy magazine is also available, including my review essay on behavioural economics.

posted on 07 October 2009 by skirchner in Centre for Independent Studies

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